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As Rihanna and Taylor Swift say they 'like to be dominated' we ask 'is it okay for men to be men again?'

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Rihanna-GQ-MagRIHANNA and fellow songstress TAYLOR SWIFT sparked controversy this week as they both told interviewers they need men to be in control.

The notions hark back to an age when men were men and women were grateful and seem all the more bizarre coming from such young pop starlets. Rihanna is 24 and Swift 22.

Gorgeous Barbadian Rihanna, no shrinking violet when it comes to flaunting her sexy bod, told GQ Magazine she gets turned on by a man 'taking control' and added: “'I like to feel like a woman. In a relationship, I wanted to be able to take a step back and have somebody else take the lead.”

She even hinted that she likes to be sexually dominated in the bedroom saying: “I could absolutely be dominant, but in general, I'd rather... How do I say this in, like, a non-
X rated version?

“Love makes you go places you probably wouldn't ever go, had it not been for love.”

Meanwhile Taylor Swift, who recently split with Conor Kennedy, 18, has revealed to Harper's Bazaar that it's when a man fails to take the reins she gets turned off.

She said: “If I feel too much like I’m wearing the pants, I start to feel uncomfortable and then we break up.”

So, have post-post feminist men got the green light to get all Neanderthal again?

Jennifer Berdahl, an associate professor of organizational behaviour at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management investigated "masculinity teasing" in the workplace in the mid-1990s.

She said: "Traditional definitions of masculinity entail a man being powerful over a woman.

"That's the masculinity that's changing. That's probably threatening to a lot of men, but to a lot it might also be liberating. If they're not feeling the pressures to be the sole breadwinners and to always perform this extreme version of masculinity, they have a lot to gain."


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